Monarchy

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Monarchy

A system of government headed by a hereditary figure such as a king or queen. There are two basic types of monarchies. In an absolute monarchy, the monarch theoretically has complete control as an autocrat, though in practice other officials have varying degrees of control as well. In a constitutional monarchy, the monarch shares power with an elected chamber or other elected leaders and, in extreme cases, has little actual power.
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The levels of support for the monarchy are the highest they have been for 20 years.
As Australians celebrate the Queen's birthday and Her Majesty's Diamond Jubilee, we should give thanks for the monarchy as a stabilising and enduring institution and for Her Majesty's life of dedicated service," he added.
Symbols mattered, and Loughlin illustrates the controversial nature of royal representation in Ireland as sites of contested loyalty and meaning between the Irish people and the monarchy.
The main political parties, including former rebels widely known as Maoists, who are led by Prachanda, signed an agreement this week to abolish the monarchy - a heated issue that caused the Communists to pull out of the government.
However, while the results seem to follow a 2006 Mori poll which saw the monarchy poll a 72% approval rating, they go against a poll by anti-monarchy group Republic last year, which said 52% of Britons no longer felt they should fund the Royals.
Their alliance with the monarchy protected the Jesuits and allowed them to carry on their religious objectives, but at a cost: they were forced to accommodate with Gallican principles.
There are those among us who aren't convinced that the masses in Britain are fully supportive of the monarchy and consequently they would vote, given the chance, to be rid of it altogether.
Another costly burden, according to some Britons, is the cost of maintaining the monarchy.
The monarchy was the only institution capable of coercing revenue out of communities.
Constant attempts are made to suggest that the monarchy is an out-dated, anachronistic institution in spite of the fact that, like all other British institutions, it has evolved steadily over the years.
Shuger argues from sixteenth--and early-seventeenth-century treatises on the monarchy that represent the monarch's justice as penitential, not penal, a justice that institutes itself as an ideal beside two other systems, the first constitutional, the second puritanical.