Knights of Labor

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Knights of Labor

A labor union founded in 1869. It reached its heyday in the 1880s when its size overreached its capacity. It finally dissolved in 1949. The Knights pushed for an eight-hour work day and the abolition of child labor. Some of their affiliates were early adopters of desegregation. The Knights opposed socialism.
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The employees were being organized by the Knights of Labor during its heyday in Canada and the United States.
The Knights of Labor had been founded in 1869 and its membership was largely Catholic.
When a brutally unjust, laissez-faire capitalism still held sway in industrialized countries, Cardinal James Gibbons of Baltimore wrote an influential letter to Pope Leo XIII in 1887 defending the Knights of Labor, the largest labor organization of the time.
The Knights of Labor made similar claims when they supported the NGCU, resolving that no " K.
This is a story with familiar highlights, such as Terence Powderly's leadership in the Knights of Labor, the unparalleled influence of Monsignor John Ryan, and the Catholic labor schools and the priests who organized them.
And for a brief time groups like the Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor succeeded in uniting disparate groups under the leadership of men like Uriah S.
Though their methods differed, both the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor (AFL) that later supplanted it sought to create among workers the equivalent of the small-town, autonomous proprietors that Thomas Jefferson and others lauded as critical for the functioning of American democracy.
In 1886, 5,000 members of the Knights of Labor conducted the first major strike, against the Iron Mountain Railroad in Arkansas.
27) Maynard applauds the effort of Cardinal James Gibbons to have the Knights of Labor exempted from the Vatican's ban on secret soci eties, and he claims that the Vatican reversed itself for the first time because of Gibbons's representations.
Similarly, a ll the familiar union histories are reviewed, including those of the Knights of Labor, the Industrial Workers of the World, the Homestead and Pullman strikes, and the formation of the AFL-CIO itself.
In 1886 the largest labor organization in the United States was the Knights of Labor.
The Knights of Labor was a Labor union that believed society should be run by consumer and worker cooperatives, not by banks and for-profit corporations.