The Intelligent Investor


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The Intelligent Investor

A 1949 book by Benjamin Graham promoting value investing, which is an investment strategy in which one seeks securities thought to be undervalued. That is, one tries to buy securities at prices lower than their true value. In The Intelligent Investor, Graham uses the character "Mr. Market," who offers securities at different prices every day. According to Graham, the smart investor waits to buy a security until Mr. Market offers a good price. See also: Buy and hold.
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In any event, greater opportunities for raising capital in the SBRE market than ever before are coming to the fore, and that can be only a good thing for the intelligent investor who wants a well-performing and truly diverse investment portfolio, and is willing to learn how to assess the new opportunities being brought into the open light for the first time in over four generations.
But as legendary value investor Ben Graham wrote in The Intelligent Investor (Collins Business; $21.
Technical analysis is represented by a first edition of Edwards and Magee's bible (1948), Technical Analysis Of Stock Trends and the fundamentals are supplied by a very early edition of Benjamin Graham's The Intelligent Investor.
Warren Buffett praised The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham, revised edition.
Jason Zweig, the Intelligent Investor columnist for The Wall Street Journal
Bogle, outspoken founder of the Vanguard funds, especially his Common Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor.
These are rooted in the work of investment banker Benjamin Graham, Buffett's mentor and the author of The Intelligent Investor, as well as several additions unique to Buffett.
Markets: The Intelligent Investor by Ben Graham; The Crowd by Gustave LeBon.
As the title suggests, John Bogle has written a book that he hopes will do for mutual fund investing what Benjamin Graham's classic The Intelligent Investor [1] did for security analysis.
Bogle's 1999 book Common Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor became a bestseller and is considered a classic.
Investor Uprising regularly produces FREE, original, in-depth reports aimed at informing the intelligent investor.
If you understand chapters 8 and 20 of The Intelligent Investor (Benjamin Graham, 1949) and chapter 12 of the General Theory (John Maynard Keynes, 1936), you don't need to read anything else and you can turn off your TV," Buffett said.

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