Gilded Age

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Gilded Age

The period of American history from approximately the end of the Civil War to the early 20th century. The Gilded Age was marked by rapid industrialization, development of infrastructure (such as railroads), and virtually no government regulation of the economy. Important industrialists, such as Andrew Carnegie, John W. Rockefeller, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and others, led a period of development that created what became the modern American economy. This age saw the early development of organized labor, which the industrialists often violently opposed. Apologists for the Gilded Age point out that this era laid the foundations for American philanthropy and employed many people who might have gone without jobs otherwise. Critics denounce the era's alleged conspicuous consumption on the part of the wealthy and economic instability that they claim came from lack of regulation. See also: Panic of 1873, Panic of 1893, Panic of 1907, Cross of Gold, Robber baron.

Gilded Age

The years between the Civil War and World War I when institutions undertook financial manipulations that went virtually unchecked by government. This era produced many infamous activities in the security markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here's how that story shows up in a third of the exams I just graded: in the Gilded Age, a growing market in grain led to bulk storage in grain elevators, which caused an increase in fraud.
said: "In HUNT: Horrors of the Gilded Age, players will be counting their bullets and crying out for help as they delve deeper into the shadowy world we've created.
of Western Ontario, Canada) presents a comparative exploration of the differing cultural and political perspectives demonstrated by editorial cartoonists in Canadian and US newspapers during the gilded age (from 1849 to the early 1900s).
They have loved her work in period dramas and know what she could bring to The Gilded Age.
ROSANNE CURRARINO'S The Labor Question in America: Economic Democracy in the Gilded Age explores the changing meaning of citizenship through the Gilded Age and into the Progressive Era.
How can an authority on the Gilded Age who writes so many books in such a short time keep turning out quality work?
Though the gilded age that greatly aided development appears to be over amid a serious economic recession, leaders say that Bloomberg is needed for another four years now more than ever for his fiscal prudence.
1) Labor historian Jim Green revisits this smoldering narrative of industrial unrest in the Gilded Age, paying particular attention to developments in Chicago.
Instead, the authors, specialists in American history, highlight the social and economic reality of the Gilded Age.
In Touched With Fire, former National Observer and Wall Street Journal writer James Perry has given us a look at five Presidents from the Gilded Age of American history--Ulysses S.
Grant for preserving the Union (he eventually published the statesman's best-selling memoirs); wrote in favor of rights for African Americans but was fond of telling racist jokes (and co-authored with Bret Harte the grotesquely anti-Chinese play Ah Sin); assailed the Gilded Age yet formed a close personal and professional relationship with the robber baron Henry Rogers; lampooned con men and scam artists yet went broke by investing in crackpot inventions and get-rich-quick schemes; and SO on.
The Gilded Age was successful in its time, and while it has become overshadowed by Twain's more richly imagined works, its legacy can be seen in the genre it established.