Breadwinner

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Breadwinner

The person who provides most or all of the income for his/her household. Stereotypically, the husband/father of a family is the breadwinner in the United States and other Western countries. However, the feminist movement in the mid-20th century and increases in the cost of living have resulted in many homes having two breadwinners. Other households have a single breadwinner of either sex out of choice or necessity.
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The breadwinner always tries to fulfil those demands.
165) The income-splitting bonus for breadwinner-homemaker marriages, in contrast, allows full deduction of half of the breadwinner's income, regardless of how much the breadwinner actually shares with the spouse, and requires no documentation of actual income sharing.
29) Unions and feminist organisations continued the push for increased equality in the workplace, (30) but the breadwinner model persisted.
Over $350,000 has been allocated towards grassroots projects in education, health and human rights work for Afghan women and girls, as a results of the royalties from The Breadwinner and Parvana's Journey.
For one-income couples in which the breadwinner is covered by an employer's plan, the stay-at-home spouse can get a full IRA deduction if the family's income was under $150,000.
8-fold when the breadwinner had lost his or her job and almost doubled when family members had died, it showed.
We decided that my wife would become the breadwinner.
Feminist historians have long argued that the nineteenth-century poor law enshrined the breadwinner wage and female dependency.
For example, if it were the husband that were the breadwinner in the family and something were to happen to him, if the wife had no skills and no experience in the workforce it would mean that she would have to then go out and pick up those skills in the event her husband passed away," Burgess said.
The idea is that the breadwinner role should be universalized so that women, too, can become breadwinners, or as Congresswoman Woolsey has phrased it, "can earn a family wage.
The Life Insurance Gap survey examined the financial planning attitudes and behaviors of 1,003 Americans age 25 and over with dependents, with a particular focus on what they want their life insurance policies to cover in the event of the death of the breadwinner.