Telecommunications Act of 1996

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Telecommunications Act of 1996

Legislation in the United States that deregulated telecommunications. It changed regulations for telephones, television broadcasts and cable in order to reduce barriers to entry and increase competition. It also regulated explicit material broadcast on television. See also: Communications Decency Act.
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para]]AARP Applauds Legislature, Calls on Governor Rauner to Sign Telecommunications Act Into Law[[/para]]
In the parliament, Malcolm Turnbull, Communications Minister has tabled corrections to the Telecommunications Act in parliament which focuses to reconcile the rules with international laws and to formalise and simplify the process for cable permits, iTnews.
In mast cases these are likely to include the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 and the Telecommunications Act 1984.
She focused on the impending rewrite of the 1996 Telecommunications Act.
The National League of Cities and a coalition of local government organizations recently filed a brief before the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals challenging the Federal Communication Commission's (FCC) interpretation of the 1996 Telecommunications Act and its finding that cable modem service is outside the scope of local franchising authorities.
When the Telecommunications Act of 1996 was signed, it was extolled by both media and industry pundits, each hailing it as a piece of landmark legislation that promised to change the face of telecommunications forever.
The Telecommunications Act of 1996 vowed to break up communications monopolies and spark competition.
As part of its responsibility under the telecommunications Act of 1996, the Federal Communications Commission is in the process of reviewing interstate access charges; and a decision is expected in the next several weeks.
The Telecommunications Act of 1996 was signed into law by President Clinton on February 8, 1996.
The Missouri Municipal League, the Missouri Association of Municipal Utilities, and the municipal utilities in Springfield, Columbia, and Sikeston had filed a petition asking the FCC to preempt the Missouri statute as contrary to the Telecommunications Act that prohibits any state or local requirement that bars the ability of any entity to provide any interstate or intrastate telecommunications service.
At a recent hearing of the Senate Commerce Committee, several senators said they would never have voted in favor of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 if they had thought it would lead to higher rates.

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