technological determinism

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technological determinism

the belief that technology is the dominant influence on employee behaviour. See SOCIOLOGY OF WORK.
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Fisher (2006) examined discourse and rhetoric about educational transformation and observed a tendency for some discourse to be framed in technological determinist language that ascribed to technology the power to inevitably cause positive change in schools.
However, Bauer and Gaskell (2002b) argue that such a technological determinist view is limited because it fails to account for the complex set of interrelated processes that shape technological development in the public sphere.
Guilio Douhet, an Italian modernist and technological determinist, was an early and vocal advocate of the idea that bombing would shorten wars.
Gunkel intelligently perceives that unstated technological determinist assumptions undergird discussions of the digital divide, assumptions that should be challenged by theories of social construction and volunteerism alongside historical evidence of the reception and adoption of new technologies.
As a technological determinist, he tells readers that his book ".
Using technological determinist arguments to paint nuclear energy opponents as hysterical Luddites is tired and ill-thought out from the standpoint of helping promote nuclear power strategies.
Borgmann is not a technological determinist and his works always include a reformist agenda.
While Sonnentag dismisses a simple technological determinist position, her account contains a residual determinism: we need to `specify the conditions and situations in which network technologies have a specific effect' (Sonnentag, 2000, p.
A technological determinist perspective recognizes that the physical, social, and inter-relational helping environments should serve as the active consideration and operative criterion for judging the costs and benefits associated with each piece of hypertechnology as it reflects the international assemblage.
Highly conscious of our `biotechnological future', and arguing the technological determinist view that society has evolved more slowly than its technologies, Catts says that he and Zur are interested in helping to produce a `hi-tech nature'.
She provides splendidly clear critiques of technological determinist and Weberian theories of history.

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