Taxable estate

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Taxable estate

That portion of a deceased person's estate that is subject to transfer tax.

Taxable Estate

The value of an individual's estate that is subject to taxation. The taxable estate includes the actual value of the estate and most gifts and transfers made for a certain period of time before death. It is important to note that any assets left to a surviving spouse and all assets under a certain dollar amount (under $1 million, depending on the year) are usually excluded from the taxable estate. See also: Estate tax.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, effectively a tax increase for all taxable estates up until April 2017, and an escalating tax increase for taxable estates thereafter, that don't qualify for the Main Residence NRB.
For decedents with taxable estates between 100% and 105% of the basic threshold amount, the amount exempt from the estate tax will be quickly phased out; this means that the decedent will not be able to use the entire amount of the basic threshold amount.
While crop farms represent about 43% of all farms, they account for nearly two-thirds of taxable estates and over half of estimated federal estate taxes.
25 percent of taxable estates, and business assets accounted for fewer than 14 percent during 2009, according to a Congressional Research Service analysis of the data.
According to the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, if the $1 million exemption is in place for 2011, the number of taxable estates is expected to increase to 44,000 from 5,500.
With the drop in portfolio values, some clients with formerly taxable estates will no longer be subject to estate taxes in 2009 and possibly in 2011 as well.
Hatcher focuses his practice in the areas of real estate transactions, business transactions, and planning for taxable estates.
They additionally desire to remove the portfolio from their taxable estates and to avoid capital gains tax.
These returns had combined taxable estates of at least $1 million for 2003 and $250,000 for 2004.
First, under the new objective tests, a wider pool of "wealthy" expatriates is expected to report taxable estates during the 10 years after expatriating.
That's because generally taxable estates worth in excess of $650,000 may be subject to federal taxes, which can be as high as 55 percent of the taxable estate.
1, 1993, the existing top estate and gift tax rates (53 percent for taxable estates and gifts between $2,500,000 and $3,000,000 and 55 percent for taxable estates and gifts over $3,000,000) were eliminated, leaving the maximum estate and gift tax rate at 50 percent for taxable estates and gifts above $2,500,000.