Nonprofit Organization

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Related to Tax-Exempt Organizations: Form 1023, Tax exempt status, 501c

Nonprofit Organization

An organization that operates as if it were a business but does not seek a profit. Common examples of nonprofits include charities, private schools, and think tanks. Nonprofits do not pay taxes; donations to many are tax-deductible, at least up to certain limits. In order to qualify for this status, however, a nonprofit must register with the IRS, under section 501(c) of the tax code. See also: 403(b).
References in periodicals archive ?
In most cases the decision on the taxability of proceeds will be determined based on whether members of the tax-exempt organization performed personal services.
However, donative intent may be only part of a larger picture; the use of a tax-exempt organization with a good reputation alone does not make a questionable transaction any better.
Hopkins is the country's leading authority on tax-exempt organizations and is a senior partner with the firm Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC.
Tax-exempt organizations must be organized for a tax-exempt purpose and this purpose must be clearly stated in your organization's governing instruments.
It will take a tax-exempt organization anywhere from 0 to 55 hours annually to comply with the new IRS disclosure rules, depending on the individual circumstances.
Muscheid -- An expert in the areas of nonprofit and tax-exempt organizations, charitable trusts, and state and local taxations, Muscheid brings a wide variety of skills to AFW.
The Service's Exempt Organizations Division (EO) is considering a voluntary compliance program under which tax-exempt organizations could disclose Sec.
The Internal Revenue Service issued new nondiscrimination rules to qualified employee benefit plans maintained by governments and tax-exempt organizations under Internal Revenue Code section 501 (a).
Nutter McClennen& Fish LLP provides a full range of income tax, estate tax, employee benefits, and tax dispute services to a broad array of domestic and multi-national corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, tax-exempt organizations, and individuals.
4958 was perhaps the most important change in Federal income tax law for tax-exempt organizations in the past 30 years.
With the enactment of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights 2, tax-exempt organizations face significant new reporting requirements and penalty taxes.
The rules let employees donate their vacation, sick or personal leave in exchange for employer-made cash donations to qualified tax-exempt organizations providing relief for the victims of natural and man-made disasters.