Tax-Deferred Account

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Tax-Deferred Account

1. See: 401(k).

2. See: Traditional IRA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Withdrawals from tax-deferred accounts will show up as ordinary income in the year in which they are withdrawn.
Based on anticipated demand, we are continuing to look at additional ways in which PENSCO can help self-directed investors and advisors get exposure to bitcoin in tax-deferred accounts.
commodity and REIT mutual funds should be held in tax-deferred accounts whenever possible with small-cap equities located in taxable accounts.
Question 1: Do you want to grow your assets in taxable accounts, tax-deferred accounts or tax-free accounts?
If you anticipate needing to draw significantly from your IRA in the near term, removing funds today from your tax-deferred accounts by taking the NUA election makes particularly good sense if you have low-basis stock.
Tax-deferred accounts such as 401(k)s or traditional IRAs enable you to delay paying taxes on today's income until you withdraw it during retirement.
There is the chance that the client will have paid more in taxes on the money he used to seed these accounts than he would have when he withdrew the money in retirement, but that is what the tax-deferred accounts are for: Those funds will be taxed at a lower rate upon withdrawal than they would have been previously.
Exceptions to the tax are provided for certain deferred tax items, specified tax-deferred accounts, and nongrantor trusts.
Tax-deferred accounts include deductible IRAs and 401(k) type accounts.
The only limit is the Internal Revenue Service's $15,000 per-year limit on contributions to tax-deferred accounts.
Amromin, Huang, and Sialm show that a significant number of households can perform a tax arbitrage by cutting back on their additional mortgage payments and increasing their contributions to tax-deferred accounts (TDA).
Huggard said a disadvantage to pulling out taxable money first is that it puts people in the position of bequeathing tax-deferred accounts, which leaves beneficiaries a big tax bill.