Tatemae

Tatemae

A Japanese term for the feelings a person projects in public, which may or may not conform to his/her true feelings. Tatemae usually corresponds to social necessities and expectations for what one's feelings ought to be. Tatemae contrasts with honne, which is how one really feels.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Takizawa Hajime argues that Yamanaka believed that there were too many films at the time that showed tatemae, i.
Maher repeatedly said that frank exposition of issues, and not separation of honne (one's true opinions) from tatemae (public stance), is necessary for the practical resolution of the Futenma issue.
If so, what is the function of tatemae in governmentality?
See Wilson, supra note 1, at 850 (noting the Japanese concepts of tatemae and honne, two principles that connote the official version of how things are--the desired appearance--and the truth of the situation, respectively).
To function as a Japanese adult involves an ability to accurately discern this distinction between honne [truly personal sentiment] and tatemae [socially appropriate facade] (see Doi 1986).
For example, they report that there are two words for truth, tatemae and honne, meaning the "socially appropriate" truth and the "actual" truth, respectively.
Ishihara says the increasingly lax application of the law is related to Japan's unique "compromise" culture of tatemae (principle) and honne (reality) a point confirmed by Raymond.
This model can be applied to the analysis of some kinds of verbal interaction styles preferred in Japanese society, such as the interaction based on honne (true intention) and tatemac (pub lic principles) in which people try to read honne hidden in the message of tatemae.
non-Japanese) and display honne (being one's true self in a peer group) and tatemae (public face).
Change is made difficult in a culture that values consensus and seniority over individual initiative, and makes a distinct delineation between tatemae (surface actions to preserve harmony) and honne (true self).
Tatemae (things as they are made to appear) refers to the face-saving, harmony-creating syndrome that permeates all aspects of Japanese life.
Japanland" is a journey into the soul of Japan and provides a rare glimpse behind the tatemae, or external image, to see the honne, or true inner character of Japan.