Tariff Quota

(redirected from Tariff Rate Quotas)

Tariff Quota

A reduced tariff applied to a certain quantity of an import. For example, a country may apply a tariff quota of 5% for the first 100,000 units of a good received each year, at which time the tariff increases to 10%.
References in periodicals archive ?
The deal will also create two tariff rate quotas (TRQs) for EU cheese entering Canada, one for 16,800 tonnes of "quality" cheese and another for 1,700 tonnes of "industrial" cheese.
As regards products considered sensitive: dairy for Canada and beef, pork and sweet corn for the EU, it has been agreed that new market access, amounting to a further 1 % and 1,9 % of tariff lines respectively, will be granted in the form of tariff rate quotas.
Twenty products of the package are subject to tariff rate quotas [TRQs] and will be eligible for import into EU duty free up to a specified quantitative limit.
The EU presented a revised request for a waiver on trade preferences for 75 products from Pakistan, which it said now included 20 on which tariff rate quotas would be applied instead of full liberalization.
Competing textile exporters such as Brazil, India, Indonesia and Bangladesh had opposed the plan but dropped their objections after the EU amended the scheme to use tariff rate quotas (TRQs) on 20 products rather than full liberalisation.
KORUS FTA defines four mechanisms for establishing better access for agricultural products: (1) the immediate opening of certain markets without restrictions, (2) the phase-out of tariffs over a specified number of years, (3) the expansion of tariff rate quotas (TRQs), with the phase-out of over-quota tariffs and (4) the imposition of safeguard measures (USTR 2008) (table 4).
In Russia production will benefit from lowered tariff rate quotas and is expected to grow by ten per cent during 2010.
GATT Article 28 provides a mechanism for member countries to renegotiate their tariff concessions in the WTO, allowing increased tariffs and setting new tariff rate quotas.
Among the topics addressed by the 12 papers presented by the editors (lead economists with the Development Research Group, World Bank) are the potential implications of agricultural trade reform, institutional arrangements for special and differential treatments for developing countries in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade/World Trade Organization, the potential impact of the July Framework's tiered market access formula approach, tariff rate quotas, the implications of tariff preferences, the elimination of agricultural export subsidies, the structure and measurement of domestic support limits, likely required aggregate measure of support reductions, the Cotton Initiative in the Doha Agenda, and government means of reform in the face of domestic opposition.
CAFTA will open their markets to our farm and industrial goods and our services by eliminating high tariffs, tariff rate quotas and non-tariff barriers.
The large number of tariff rate quotas (TRQs) that exist for food and agricultural products provides a major aggregation problem and the possibility of aggregation bias, since the database we employ aggregates many such products into single commodities.
Under the proposal, so-called sensitive products would be subject to an average tariff cut with a minimum to be applied, combined with volume-based tariff rate quotas.