Tariff Escalation

Tariff Escalation

A situation in which the tariff on raw material imports is lower than the tariff on semi-finished goods, which is lower still than the tariff on finished products. Tariff escalation is the most common tariff regime.
References in periodicals archive ?
To a question whether the IMF agrees with tariff escalation by the US, Lagarde said that no one would agree with measures that restrict growth.
He also assured that the use of farm residue pellets would not result in a tariff escalation for the power generator.
The charges are levied on chocolate products but not raw cocoa beans So-called tariff escalation is criticised for discouraging industrial development.
If we are to industrialise, tariff escalation and peak tariffs should be eliminated.
However, the US leaves behind critical issues for developing countries, such as trade-distorting domestic farm subsidies, anti-dumping rules and tariff escalation of some products.
It has led to dramatic interference of government in the economic activities, specifically in the field of trade policies where Iranian tariff regime is characterized by high average tariff (nominal and import-weighted tariff), an extremely high dispersion of tariff levels across tariff lines and a significant amount of tariff escalation.
He called on Latin governments to write their trade agendas along the same lines, addressing Chinese tariff escalation regimes that impose higher duties on goods as they move up the value-added scale.
Its interest is in elimination of tariff peaks, tariff escalation and non-tariff barriers on products of export interest (like textiles, clothing, leather goods, cotton, rice and fruits) in other markets.
focus on "tariff peaks, high tariffs, and tariff escalation.
Pakistan also strives for market access and substantial overall reduction in tariffs; deeper cuts in higher tariffs; tariff escalation to be addressed; concept of SP and Special Safeguard Mechanism for developing countries; tariffs capping at 100 % for developed countries and 150 % for developing countries.
This also has important implications for market access, tariff escalation being highlighted as a key issue affecting developing country exports (World Bank, 2003).
For example, developed countries' tariff escalation for many agricultural exports of developing countries remains an acute problem.