Tariff Equivalent

Tariff Equivalent

A non-tariff barrier that has the same effect as a tariff. That is, a tariff equivalent discourages imports and promotes domestic industries and companies. Examples of tariff equivalents include import quotas or licensing restrictions. The GATT and the WTO have both tried to reduce tariff equivalents to promote more international trade.
References in periodicals archive ?
To take the example of the United States, I find that the level of trade costs in the year 2000, expressed as a tariff equivalent, is lowest for Canada at 25%, followed by Mexico at 33%.
Known as Welsh Bac, it offers the potential for a UCAS tariff equivalent to an A grade at A-level, and is a recognised entry qualification for the majority of higher education courses and institutions in the UK.
In this case, the ad valorem tariff equivalent is the difference between the domestic and world prices relative to the world price.
And at oil prices at US$200 per barrel, the tariff equivalent rate will rise to 15 per cent.
For each pupil attending, a school will receive a tariff equivalent to the national average cost of educating a child ( approximately pounds 5,500 by 2007-08.
Thus, for the European Union, agricultural tariffs against developing countries average 33 percent, whereas the tariff equivalent of subsidies stands at 10 percent.
The expression for the tariff equivalent of the optimum quota in Palivos and Yip (1997a) does not depend on the interest rate.
Indeed, in some cases the average merchandise tariff is significantly greater than the estimated services tariff equivalent (South and Southeast Asia, Middle East, and North Africa).
Upon completion and operation of the Fourth Line project, Transener will receive a fixed annual cash tariff equivalent to US$24.
An example is the replacement of quotas by their tariff equivalent (tariffication) in an attempt to reduce rent seeking associated with the trade regime.
The first component captures the disincentives for free riding; the second is a proxy for the size of the jackpot benefits expected for a given tariff or tariff equivalent.
Economists often calculate ad valorem tariff equivalents of NTMs.