Tariff Equivalent

Tariff Equivalent

A non-tariff barrier that has the same effect as a tariff. That is, a tariff equivalent discourages imports and promotes domestic industries and companies. Examples of tariff equivalents include import quotas or licensing restrictions. The GATT and the WTO have both tried to reduce tariff equivalents to promote more international trade.
References in periodicals archive ?
Annex 5 of the AoA states that the tariff equivalent of converting any nontariff measures shall be based on the difference between the domestic price and international price (cost, insurance and freight unit value, or CIF) of the commodity for 1986 to 1988.
Specifically, 'a 35-percent tariff rate seems appropriate as a tariff equivalent,' PIDS recommended.
Ecorys (2009) addressed this question and reported the analysis in the form of percentage cost reduction or percentage tariff equivalent price increase.
Their topics include nontariff measures and standards in trade and global value chains, tariff equivalent and foregone trade effects of prohibitive technical barriers to trade, protectionism indices for nontariff measures: an application to maximum residue levels, the trade and welfare impacts of Australian quarantine policies: the case of pig meat, and phytosanitary regulation and agricultural flows: tobacco inputs and cigarette outputs.
We can start with the tariff equivalent of the QR to 30 to 40 percent but commit to reduce that over time," Balisacan said.
To take the example of the United States, I find that the level of trade costs in the year 2000, expressed as a tariff equivalent, is lowest for Canada at 25%, followed by Mexico at 33%.
While mills are demanding tariff equivalent to the one being paid to independent power producers (IPPs), the policy planners are not ready to offer that.
Known as Welsh Bac, it offers the potential for a UCAS tariff equivalent to an A grade at A-level, and is a recognised entry qualification for the majority of higher education courses and institutions in the UK.
Thus, the government should try to introduce a tariff equivalent (sum of the quantitative impact of tariffs and non-tariff measures) equal to cost of smuggling.
Saara Tamminen from Ecorys said that when they converted the cost that regulations impose into a tariff equivalent, the most costly non-tariff measures were in the cosmetics, food and beverages (more so on the US side) and financial services (again, more on the US side) sectors.
In this case, the ad valorem tariff equivalent is the difference between the domestic and world prices relative to the world price.
For each pupil attending, a school will receive a tariff equivalent to the national average cost of educating a child ( approximately pounds 5,500 by 2007-08.