Smoot-Hawley Act

(redirected from Tariff Act of 1930)

Smoot-Hawley Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1930, that raised tariffs on thousands of imports. The idea behind the Act was to protect American jobs, especially those of farmers, from cheap imports. However, the Act is considered to have been a failure because it led to retaliatory measures in foreign countries, which reduced U.S. exports. Some economists consider the Act to have been a contributing cause to the depth of the Great Depression. See also: NAFTA, Trade war.
References in periodicals archive ?
Senator Angus King (I-Maine) today announced his support for the Self-Initiation Trade Enforcement Act, bipartisan legislation which would amend the Tariff Act of 1930 to create a permanent task force at the International Trade Administration (ITA), an agency within the Department of Commerce, to focus specifically on trade violations affecting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).
asp) Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 , which (http://www.
Under the Tariff Act of 1930, US industries may forward a petition for relief from imports that are sold at less than fair value in the United States or which benefit from subsidies provided through foreign government programs, according to the US International Trade Commission.
International Trade Commission (ITC) has been resolving unfair trade practices, especially patent infringement disputes under Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930.
They examine the origins of the American Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930, first-class passenger ship fares between Britain and New York City from the 1820s to the outbreak of World War I, the American savings and loan meltdown of 1986-1995, investor responses to monetary and fiscal reforms adopted in the wake of an Ottoman government default in 1875, and the behavior of inflation expectations in the early 1930s in the US.
Electrification, tractorization and motorization: revisiting the Smoot-Hawley tariff act of 1930.
Global trade fell by some 60% from 1929 to 1932, as major economies turned inward and embraced protectionist trade policies, such as America's infamous Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930.
section] 1337 ("[section] 337"), a provision of the Tariff Act of 1930 which proscribes the importation of "articles that infringe" a patent.
The Tariff Act of 1930 bars the import of goods made by convict, forced or indentured labor, but it exempts goods for which US demand outstrips domestic production.
Among foreign trade laws, few have as potentially a drastic impact on manufacturers and importers as Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, which makes importing "articles that infringe" a U.
Summary: Among foreign trade laws, few have as potentially a drastic impact on manufacturers and importers as Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, which .