Tallyman


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Tallyman

1. A salesman who sells products and accepts installment payments.

2. A person who keeps track of shipped, received or produced inventory. A tallyman may account for products by unit or by weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Junior mining companies interested in exploring specific parcels of land will soon be able to contact the tallyman directly through a new piece of software that will be on the CMEB website in September.
Demand for Tallyman is at a record high brought about by an increasing level of unsecured consumer debt and credit defaults - coupled with the realisation by companies that Customer Revenue Management (CRevM) is an essential part of any effective CRM strategy.
Consumer debt stands at 690 billion [pounds sterling] and, according to a Tallyman survey, will increase by 30 per cent in the next year.
Pictures: Richard Names' LEAPS AND BOUNDS: Tallyman Khoum from Axe with Michael Ali (left) and Joseph Wilson
They've even got a few from Yorkshire - axels for teeth (which will give you dentists) and tallyman (meaning bailiffs and debt collectors).
But it was as a tallyman - the hatchet man and money collector for the shadowy figures who ran the protection rackets and illegal money-lending schemes - that Boyle became infamous.
Global IT group Sanderson has appointed a new management team for its Tallyman credit management business.
com chose to partner with Akopia, because its Tallyman solution is one of the most popular, open-source, electronic commerce applications for the Linux operating system.
SANDERSON CFL, of Coventry, has appointed Ms Liz Ball as sales manager for its Tallyman system software.
TurboLinux Server includes robust e-commerce software for business-to-business transactions: Apache (secure Web server), Tallyman (e-commerce suite) and OpenMerchant (shopping cart).
He worked as a tallyman at lumber mills, including Hines, Pope & Talbot and Pennington Crossarm Co.
Mary would order the best linens, curtains, towels, and occasionally long-life underwear, then tout them round the streets for almost half what the tallyman charged.