Taliban

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Taliban

A political movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001. When it was in power, the Taliban was noted for brutal treatment of women and for almost entirely wiping out the cultivation of opium, which was until then one of Afghanistan's primary cash crops. It based its teachings and rule on an austere interpretation of Islam combined with Pashto tribal law. In 2001, it was overthrown by the United States and coalition forces. Since 2004, the Taliban has become a major insurgent group in Afghanistan, funded through opium trade.
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Tom Little, an optometrist from Delmar, New York, returned to Afghanistan after the Taliban government was toppled in November 2001.
Not long after, the Arab volunteers (with Osama bin Laden at the helm) found refuge with the new Taliban government in Afghanistan.
IMMIGRATION officials yesterday renewed their pledge not to grant asylum to terrorists after reports that a former Taliban government minister was seeking refuge in Britain.
We didn't accept the new representative of the Taliban government.
The airline is slowly resuming operations following the fall of the Taliban government, reports The Associated Press.
The families of George Smith and Tom Sawyer, both of whom died when the towers collapsed on September 11, are suing bin Laden for hundreds of millions of dollars in damages, along with al Qaida and the deposed Taliban government.
Khan's group is a leading critic of Afghanistan's ruling Taliban government, which U.
THE Taliban government is probably behind a sudden increase in Afghan opium that is making its way into Europe and Asia, a US official has said.
He was speaking yesterday on the day Saudi Arabia cut off diplomatic ties with the fundamentalist Taliban government, leaving Pakistan as the only country in the world which recognises it.
THE United Arab Emirates yesterday cut diplomatic relations with the Taliban government, leaving it recognised by only two nations.
Friends like Pakistan and the Jidda-based OIC will help us in deciding who are real Ulema,'' he said, adding that the top leadership of the Taliban government is comprised of men who have graduated from religious schools and universities.
One would not know how far Pakistan could use its influence in making the dialogue a success; nevertheless Pakistan can request the Taliban leadership, as Pakistan was one of the two countries that had recognized Taliban government in Afghanistan.