Taliban


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Taliban

A political movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001. When it was in power, the Taliban was noted for brutal treatment of women and for almost entirely wiping out the cultivation of opium, which was until then one of Afghanistan's primary cash crops. It based its teachings and rule on an austere interpretation of Islam combined with Pashto tribal law. In 2001, it was overthrown by the United States and coalition forces. Since 2004, the Taliban has become a major insurgent group in Afghanistan, funded through opium trade.
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And while an official national reconciliation program to reach out to Taliban rank and file has had limited success, the parliament itself is a forum for reconciliation where resentments are expressed with words rather than bullets.
According to the report, the Taliban is gaining strength in large rural parts of the country because the central government is perceived as corrupt and unable to deliver services.
But he said the appointment of Arsala Rahmani, a high-ranking official of the Taliban religious affairs ministry, to the Parliament's upper house was contributing to a feeling of "real pessimism" among human rights groups inside and outside the country.
It's also promising that some 3 million refugees have returned to Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban.
It has not been uncommon to see frequent defections from Taliban lines to NA troop concentrations, and the defectors are soon treated as part of the NA.
The offer came after US B-52s carried out intense bombing of Taliban positions in the hills outside Kunduz, sending huge fireballs into the sky.
The Pentagon said US special forces were in southern Afghanistan, working on the next phase of the campaign against the Taliban and al Qaida terrorists.
The Taliban's crackdown on homosexuality is more than a reaction to the flourishing gay rights movement in the West, says Vikram Parekh, a Taliban expert in the Asia division of Human Rights Watch in New York City.
The United States does not anticipate a collapse of the Taliban regime any time soon, Inderfurrh indicated.
Three and a half years after its inception, Afghanistan's extremist Taliban militia has come within an inch of its stated goal: unifying the country by force of arms.
Afghan Taliban refused to do the job," says Bucherer, "so Mullah Omar sent in foreigners-Arabs, Chechens, Sudanese-to blow them up.