Taft-Hartley Act

(redirected from Taft-Hartley Act of 1947)
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Taft-Hartley Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 1947, that amended and rolled back some of the provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. Specifically, the Act provided a list of "unfair labor practices" in which unions and other forms of organized labor could not engage. It prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wherein workers protest transfers to another division or role within the same company, and wildcat strikes, or strikes unauthorized by a union. It also forbade solidarity or other political strikes, and disallowed unions from donating to federal political campaigns. Importantly, the Taft-Hartley Act allowed individual states to pass right-to-work laws. See also: Featherbedding, National Labor Relations Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 was a milestone in that anti-union battle.
That was the practice, and unions spread like wildfire, understandably," until the card-check option was curtailed by the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947, giving employers the right to demand a secret-ballot election.
In fact, the National Labor Relations Act, which became the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947, exempted hospitals from its mandates and made legal recourse for any unfair treatment impossible.