Taft-Hartley Act

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Taft-Hartley Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 1947, that amended and rolled back some of the provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. Specifically, the Act provided a list of "unfair labor practices" in which unions and other forms of organized labor could not engage. It prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wherein workers protest transfers to another division or role within the same company, and wildcat strikes, or strikes unauthorized by a union. It also forbade solidarity or other political strikes, and disallowed unions from donating to federal political campaigns. Importantly, the Taft-Hartley Act allowed individual states to pass right-to-work laws. See also: Featherbedding, National Labor Relations Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
A broader view would have reported on other postwar setbacks encountered by labor, with the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 restraining the strike weapon, and the Red Scare of the 1950's removing militants from labor's ranks.
The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 is a number of amendments added to the Wagner Act that were lobbied by employers to limit powers of employees.
With the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 they began the work of limiting organized labour's organizing tactics and constraining its field of operation to a narrower range of workplace-related questions.