Taft-Hartley Act


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Taft-Hartley Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 1947, that amended and rolled back some of the provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. Specifically, the Act provided a list of "unfair labor practices" in which unions and other forms of organized labor could not engage. It prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wherein workers protest transfers to another division or role within the same company, and wildcat strikes, or strikes unauthorized by a union. It also forbade solidarity or other political strikes, and disallowed unions from donating to federal political campaigns. Importantly, the Taft-Hartley Act allowed individual states to pass right-to-work laws. See also: Featherbedding, National Labor Relations Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
The legislation introduced today would repeal Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act, which currently gives states the ability to ban union security agreements - so-called "right-to-work" laws.
In 1947, the Taft-Hartley Act made benefits part of the collective bargaining process.
Bush invoked the rarely used Taft-Hartley Act to reopen the ports.
Truman's veto of the Taft-Hartley Act, designed to limit the power of organized labor.
President Obama is unlikely to invoke the Taft-Hartley Act, which empowers him to order the strikers back to work.
To understand the distinction between fairness and freeloading it's necessary to go back to the Taft-Hartley Act, an anti-union piece of legislation approved by a Republican Congress in 1947.
He speaks in particular about the barriers thrown up by the passage of the Taft-Hartley Act in 1947 and the Landrum-Griffin Act in 1959, both of which ushered in new institutional constraints for unionists.
but members of Congress voted in sufficient numbers to overturn the President's veto with the constitutionally required two-thirds majority in both the Senate and the House of Representatives, and the Taft-Hartley Act was enacted into law on June 23, 1947.
Modern labor relations date from the 1947 Taft-Hartley Act, which modified the Wagner Act mainly by defining the rights of employers in the framework it had provided.
While ensuring that the workforce remains unrepresented has always been a cat-and-mouse game, one which management has played well through the use of flattery, deceit, rewards and intimidation, the statutory limits on labor's power are directly traceable to the Taft-Hartley Act, passed in 1947.
By the time President Bush invoked the Taft-Hartley Act, over 200 ships were lined up outside of ports waiting to pick up or unload containers.