Tael

(redirected from Taels)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Tael

A unit of weight in Taiwan approximately equivalent to 37.5 grams. It is used primarily in the sale of bulk foodstuffs. An equivalent term is niu.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deqing made great progress in Chan meditation and was appreciated by literati after moving to Beijing, but he did not perceive even the slightest hope of restoring Baoen si, a task that according to his later estimate would cost about one hundred thousand taels of silver.
Cisheng then attempted to build a temple for him with three thousand taels of silver, but Deqing, together with the envoy, distributed the money to others in her name.
The Southern Song accepted its inferior status as a vassal state of the Jin empire and agreed to pay an annual "tribute" (gong) of 250,000 taels of silver and a similar number of bolts of silk.
In 1897, new foreign loans needed to pay the 1895 Japanese indemnity created an annual central government deficit of about 20 million taels, or about 20 percent of the Qing government budget.
Greatrex, "A Brief Introduction to the First Jinchuan War," gives slightly lower figures, totaling 61 million taels, for the two campaigns (p.
59) Johan Taels, "Ethics and Subjectivity: A Reversal of Perspective," Ethical Perspectives 2 (1995) 165-80.
The latest move by the SBV was made on Thursday when it ordered the Saigon Jewelry Company to produce an additional 4,000 taels of SJC-brand Gold, which will be used for exchange by the public from their non-SJC and deformed Gold, at a fee of 50,000 VND (US$2.
74-M Vietnamese Dong (VND) (US$2,289) per tael (1 tael equal to 1.
In August 1859 the Advertiser noted that the latest two importations of opium had totaled 3,700 taels (345 lbs.
100 Taels Russo-Chinese Bank Specimen from 1907 and over 300 lots of rare and unique Chinese banknotes
Russo-Chinese 100 Tael Banknote Specimen from 1907, Lot # 1181 in the auction, estimated $10,000 to $20,000.
The government of China, for example, could either establish a new currency through its central bank or allow multiple private banks to issue their own gold-based currencies, perhaps based on a traditional Chinese monetary unit such as the tael.