U.S. Treasury Note

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U.S. Treasury Note

A debt security backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government with a maturity between one and 10 years. They may be purchased directly from the government or from a bank; they have coupon payments payable every six months. Treasury notes may be bought competitively or non-competitively. In a non-competitive transaction, one takes the interest rate he/she is given on a Treasury note. In competitive investing, one bids on a desired yield; however, this does not mean it will be accepted. Treasury notes are low-risk, low-return investments. The minimum purchase is $1,000 and the maximum is $1 million in competitive bidding, or $5 million in non-competitive. They are known informally as T notes. See also: Treasury Bill, Treasury Bond.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other maturities include 5- and 10-year Treasury notes, or T-notes.
Therap's applications include Health Tracking, Individual and Emergency Data Forms, Medication Administration Records, Individual Service Plans, Behavior Plans and Tracking, T-Logs, T-Notes, Incident Reports, Management Summaries, Witness Reports, Supported Employment Tracking, Calendar, Secure Communications, Staff Scheduling, Training Management System, Attendance and Electronic Billing.
Plans to buy T-notes as well as an expansion of their MBS and GSE purchasing puts money back into the market and takes more untradeable debt off the banks' books; but it does little to answer the momentum in behind the United States' deep recession.
In principle, subtracting TIIS from nominal T-notes of the same maturity should give economists a market-based measure of expected inflation, but these securities have not achieved that goal.
Figure 1 shows the standard deviation of the monthly per capita real growth of the monetary base, T-bills and T-notes, and all marketable T-secs, including bills, notes, bonds, and certificates of indebtedness since 1920.
So, while the Feds have doubled the overnight borrowing rate to 6 percent and the prime rate is now at 9 percent, yields on 5-year T-Notes are down to last years levels of around 6 percent as of June 7th.
Guided by the firm's Chief Equity Strategist, Dirk van Dijk, Income Plus offers investors a fresh alternative to T-Notes, CDs, and Money Market Accounts.
While most of the foreign debt is in T-notes, try think of it as if we were selling off companies instead of T-notes.
T-notes anywhere on the yield curve do not offer any protection from that happening.
It will not resolve the debate within the Fed about resorting to unconventional methods of increasing the money supply by buying up large quantities of long-term T-notes, but is probably a minor argument in favor of doing so.
While most of the foreign debt is in T-notes, try thinking of it as if we were selling off companies instead of T-notes.