Sweated Labor

Sweated Labor

Work done in a sweatshop. Sweated labor is work done in poor conditions for low level, often below subsistence, wages. See also: Minimum wage, Living wage.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, speaking of how western manufacturing was outsourced to "cheap wage locations" in the third or "underdeveloped" world, he denounces the treatment of the "'peripheral' countries, which were, he says, "subjected to sweated labor, privatized facilities, slashed welfare, and surreally inequitable terms of trade" (4).
And more affluent women do have a history of effective sweated labor boycotts in the past: in the Victorian era, impoverished women were going blind in the "needle trades," turning out elaborate embroideries for wealthy women, until revulsion on the part of these consumers forced conditions to better.
And more affluent women do have a history of effective sweated labor boycotts in the past: in the Victorian era, impoverished women were going blind in the `needle trades', turning out elaborate embroideries for wealthy women, until revulsion on the part of these consumers forced conditions to better.
Watch the latest crop of parents on morose queues to buy overpriced club strips and insignia, also made with cheap and often sweated labor, with the brand of a failed multinational emblazoned on it.
For example, he could push hard for the minimum-wage increase he proposed in June, not only a humane and just thing to do but one that would improve the bargaining ]ever age of trade unions that struggle to stay afloat in a sea of sweated labor.
Initially, inspectors associated ethnicity, or what was then regarded as race, with disease, immorality, and sweated labor, claiming that the "negative 'racial characteristics of the Jew'" accounted for the rise of the sweatshop (47).
Did the Conservative Party equal the male-dominated trades union's concerns for equal pay, an end to sweated labor, and domestic violence, and a greater voice in decision making?
These developments were accompanied by what workers saw as a decline in apprenticeship, and increases in piece-work and (what would later be termed) sweated labor.
Recent news reports have drawn attention to the pervasiveness of sweated labor in the clothing industry.
The New International Division of Labor is a rather abstract concept which embraces such issues as runaway shops; the deindustrialization of first world economies; the explosion of offshore assembly and manufacturing plants (maquiladoras) in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean; the accentuation of sweated labor and coercion of (mostly) womens' labor; and virtually everything else connected with that buzzword of the 1990s - globalization.
We call on ourselves to express solidarity with striking workers, with victims of child labor and sweated labor, with Sandinistas, Zapatistas, French transit workers, East Timorese, or the African National Congress.
Since sweated labor was not exclusively female (though a disproportionate share of laborers in this category were women), Hart characterizes that focus as more class-based than gender-based.