I

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I

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that it is the third preferred bond of the company.

I

1. On a stock transaction table, a symbol indicating that a dividend was paid after a stock split.

2. A symbol appearing next to a bond listed on NASDAQ indicating that the bond is a company's third preferred bond. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if the letter "I" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is a third preferred bond.

i

Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables to indicate that the dividend was paid after a stock dividend or split: Lehigh s.20i.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Risk factors for surgical site infection following orthopaedic spinal operations.
Surgical site infections occurring after hospital discharge.
Of those, surgical site infections (SSIs) were detected in inpatients and at readmission for 4,453, and body mass index (BMI) data were available for 43%.
Overall nutritional screening scores, using the nutritional risk ratings employed by our institution's nutrition service, were not significantly associated with surgery type, preoperative nasal culture status, or surgical site infection in our patient population.
Surgical site infections (SSIs) present a great challenge to health care facilities in the United States.
In addition to this, there is evidence that some of the routine interventions used in health care facilities contribute to the increased risk of surgical site infection.
We have described the use of diagnoses and procedures listed on automated billing data and of antibiotic prescriptions identified through automated pharmacy dispensing data to identify patients who are likely to have experienced postoperative surgical site infection both before or after discharge from the hospital (5,17,18).
Surgical site infections following hysterectomy declined from 1.
Until now, no local wound therapy--including topical antibiotics, subcutaneous drain placement, or delayed primary closure--has been proved to decrease surgical site infection in a rigorous clinical trial.
CINCINNATI -- Surgical site infections found in deep wounds or in organs or spaces manipulated during an operation might occur more often after general surgical procedures if patients have low blood albumin or are operated on through a previous incision, according to the results of a case-control study.
Hospital stay increases by an average of 7 days if a surgical site infection occurs," said Dr.