Supranational

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Supranational

Describing an organization that exists in multiple countries. While, theoretically, supranational could refer to multinational corporations, the term most often describes an international government or quasi-government organization. Examples include the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund. Supranational organizations often have a direct role in regulation. For example, an international treaty may set up certain standards for international trade. It is important to note, however, that enforcement of these provisions is left to individual, sovereign governments.
References in periodicals archive ?
So the opponents' tactics seemed quite successful: the content of the Bonnefous Plan was not really discussed, civil aviation was more or less excluded from the discussion and, most important, supranationality seemed discarded.
This contradiction is something that should be carefully watched as it c ontains the possibility of a conflict between the principle of national sovereignty (and non-intervention in the internal affairs of a member country) and that of increased supranationality implied by 4(h): "[T]he right of the Union to intervene in a Member State pursuant to a decision of the Assembly in respect of grave circumstances, namely war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity".
Congress, who have accused international secretariats of having ambitions of supranationality.
To be sure, centralization or supranationality may facilitate an internationalization of political authority, and the latter may even create some incentives for it.
In that sense, the Vatican supports the idea of supranationality and gradual global integration of churches through joint social activities (with the aim of evangelization), while the SOC to larger extent was and still is theologically and "nationally" directed, insisting on church criteria of dialogue and cooperation.
Those who dislike the drift of power in the EU towards inter-governmentalism, and away from supranationality, may oppose some proposed measures.
Supranationality -- in this case the process through which a trinational body whose powers are agreed upon could have preeminence over domestic legislative bodies -- seemingly posed a threat to Mexican sovereignty.
European governmance is thus marked not only by reversed intergovernmentalism but, more importantly, by a test synthesis of supranationality and intergovernmentalism.
the European integration process means a weakening of the State, This is obvious in the moment in which a supranational body is established: supranationality means "transfer of sovereignty" and sovereignty is exactly the main characteristic of the State.