Supranational

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Supranational

Describing an organization that exists in multiple countries. While, theoretically, supranational could refer to multinational corporations, the term most often describes an international government or quasi-government organization. Examples include the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund. Supranational organizations often have a direct role in regulation. For example, an international treaty may set up certain standards for international trade. It is important to note, however, that enforcement of these provisions is left to individual, sovereign governments.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second source of papal strength, according to Johnson, is its internationalism or, at least in aspiration, supranationalism.
Transnationalism or supranationalism is no easy sell and the dicta of national pragmatism still overrule them.
These last contributions may seem only faintly related to the main themes of the book - unless to hammer another nail into the coffin of Marxist supranationalism.
For Britain, the real issues are not national sovereignty versus supranationalism, but the choice between a liberal, market oriented path to integration and a planned, centralised one.
Topics studied include borders as tourist attractions and destinations in their own right, as barriers to travel and the growth of tourism, boundaries as links of transit and the growth of supranationalism.
Observing the past six decades of European integration, one could contend that it has essentially been a convoluted process involving a search for the proper balance along the traditional dichotomy between supranationalism and intergovernmentalism.
Supranationalism was strengthened by the powers of the European Parliament and the Court of Justice.
The real problem is in the manner in which supranationalism is representative for the European Union
The great doctrinal dispute was, and is, between supranationalism and intergovernmentalism.
Hari Singh's excellent chapter on Malaysia in Robertson and East suggests that "a continuing concern with high politics, supplemented by limited decentralization and supranationalism, reinforces the realist tradition in Malaysian foreign policy.
It helps explain the EU passion for international treaties, supranationalism, and global governance.