Subject

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Subject

Refers to a bid or offer that cannot be executed without confirmation from the customer. In other words, not firm, but a bid/offer that needs additional information/confirmation before becoming firm and is therefore still negotiable.

Subject

Describing a bid or offer for a security that is still negotiable. That is, a subject bid/offer is not firm and requires confirmation before a transaction involving it can be executed.
References in periodicals archive ?
His habit was to delete the first person pronoun, giving rise to those choppy, subjectless sentences so beloved by comedians.
With narrative it is possible to discuss it [the universal meaning of history] in such a way that the talk about this universal meaning does not shift over into a drive to logical totality, into a kind of transcendental necessity, as a consequence of which the destinies of individuals, the practical histories of meaning for individual men and women, would become ineluctably secondary in comparison with a "necessary" meaning of salvation for the whole of history, and could be integrated only after the fact into the subjectless realm of this kind of definitive history of salvation.
Under the influence of Latin, the verb could occupy the initial position not only in subjectless declarative clauses.
The word you21, translated as an existential, is syntactically transitive subjectless 'have' in Chinese.
The subjectless verb-initial sentence type is characteristic of optatives.
Any verb in the form of subjectless suppressive (in a language where this voice exists):
This study investigates the syntactic features of Nigerian English which have been created through the following processes--the use of subjectless sentences, reduplication, double subjects, Pidgin-influenced structures, discourse particles, verbless sentences, and substitution.
we believe that the data presented make a strong point in favor of a subjectless analysis of LRIs.
Namely, the subjectless suppressive blocks the SemA-slot X, and the objectless suppressive, the SemA-slot Y.
Fisiak has contributed a number of papers on Old and Middle English phonology, in particular on OE and ME consonant clusters and vocalic changes (1967, 1968, 1982a, 1988a), on subjectless sentences in Middle English (1976) and on certain ME linguistic changes due to social motivation (1977b).
According to Hamann and Plunkett (1998), who evaluated various explanations for subjectless sentences, it is within the framework provided by the FCH that subject drop has been accounted for most successfully.