Stylized Facts

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Stylized Facts

Facts that have been widely observed in many different contexts. Stylized facts are sometimes assumed to be always true, but this is not always the case. The term is most common in macroeconomics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first stylized fact I observe is shared by all the episodes in the mentioned set of crises.
The stylized fact that almost no one seems to dispute is that Japan has "lost" two decades of growth, and that the icy grip of deflation on the economy is responsible.
A key stylized fact that productivity analysts must explain has been the divergence in productivity growth between Europe and the United States since 1995, with productivity growth in the United States accelerating and that in Europe falling off.
Stylized Fact #1: Sellers restrict the number of bidders.
Hence, the stylized fact is that the productivity growth rate in the 50s and 60s was higher than the later period and the productivity slowdown began in the early to middle of the 70s.
Patenting activity declines in the later years of the life cycle, and the number of firms also follow a time trend consistent with the stylized fact [1].
One stylized fact is that multinationals have good management practices wherever they are located--so multinationals in the United States, Brazil, and India all appear to be well run.
65 reflects the stylized fact that in most industrialized economies, labor's share of national income is about two-thirds.
Rather than study the behavior of inventory investment for a particular phase of the business cycle, I choose to document the stylized facts of such investment over the entire business cycle using standard methods) A stylized fact is an observed empirical regularity between particular variables, which is of interest because economic theory predicts a certain pattern for it.
A key stylized fact that has informed macroeconomic model builders for the last several decades is that the price level has been procyclical in the U.
The stylized fact, cited by several authors (Blanchard and Diamond, 1990; Davis and Haltiwanger, 1990, 1992; Ritter, 1993), that job destruction tends to dominate employment changes during recessions thus appears to be generated by manufacturing industries.