Structural Adjustment

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Also found in: Acronyms.

Structural Adjustment

A government program in a developing country making changes to economic or monetary policies in order to better facilitate growth. For example, a structural adjustment loan may include a stipulation that the borrowing country relax any protectionist subsidies or impose higher taxes to balance the budget. Structural adjustments are necessary in some cases before the IMF or the World Bank will make loans to finance further development. See also: Structural Adjustment Facility.
References in periodicals archive ?
A structural adjustment program can be called successful if it achieves the objectives of the program itself while the program can be termed as unsuccessful from the country's optimum development point of view.
Algeria is implementing a structural adjustment program backed by the IMF and the World Bank.
By the end of the '80s, declining oil revenues and economic difficulties led to a new economic orientation and in '91 the government embarked on a comprehensive economic reform and structural adjustment program.
The economic reform and structural adjustment program in Israel seems to not have had much of an effect on trading patters between Egypt and Israel.
5 billion yen in nonproject grants for a structural adjustment program and 800 million yen for increasing food production.
The Nigerian debt, for example, rose from $20 to $30 billion in the 1980s after a Structural Adjustment Program was introduced.
17) However, the term Structural Adjustment Program generally indicates the specific programs pursued by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.
The in-depth analysis of Structural Adjustment Program shows that IMF policies totally failed to bring any macroeconomic stability.
The government has also entered into a structural adjustment program with the International Monetary Fund.
In agreeing to end the revolt, the soldiers asked the government to expel officials from the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Australian government who have been overseeing a structural adjustment program in return for soft loans aimed at ending the country's long-term recession.
One school of thought has suggested that the Structural Adjustment Program would address imbalances by shifting rural-urban terms of trade decisively in favour of rural producers and thereby encouraging a "return migration.
The collapse in the world market of Rwanda's principal exports--coffee and tea--and a subsequent structural adjustment program pushed by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund added economic hardship to ethnic strife.

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