Strong Currency


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Strong Currency

A currency whose value compared to other currencies is improving, as indicated by a decrease in the direct exchange rates for the currency.

Strong Currency

A currency when it is worth more relative to other currencies. Because most currencies are floating, their values vary according to market trends. When one unit of a currency trades for more units of another currency, it is known as a strong currency. When a currency is strong, travelers are able to go abroad while spending less of their money, but it makes exports more expensive in other countries. A strong currency can be disinflationary for currencies pegged to it. See also: Weak currency, Exchange rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
A strong currency and elevated levels of productivity are the only sound fundamental principles that create prosperity for every citizen.
A strong currency may undermine the country's strengths and competitiveness.
Chevron's announcement came just a day after General Motors Co (GM) said it would cease manufacturing in Australia by 2017, citing pressures from the nation's strong currency and intense competition in the local automobile market.
Costs in Australian LNG development have rocketed, partly due to high wages and a strong currency, and so have put the brakes on development there over the past year and hurt contractors like Cape.
Driven by a strong currency and a desire to shop abroad, Brazilians continue to explore international destinations.
The euro is a strong currency, and there was always confidence in it.
Canada's growth outlook dimmed over the last quarter, a Reuters poll showed, with soft export demand, a strong currency, and a cooling housing market combining to weaken economic expectations.
UK plastics firms need to implement a strong currency strategy, something that Smart Currency can offer.
If the goods purchased are priced in euro, yuan or another strong currency then that will have a negative effect on the economy as more funds are needed to make that purchase.
The government maintains that the strong currency harms its exporters, and indeed Brazil's trade surplus has been dwindling despite record high prices for many of the country's commodities.
Organised crime syndicates no doubt look at Australia and see a lucrative drug market and a strong currency compared to the US dollar," said Zuccato.