Reinsurance

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Reinsurance

The spreading of risk and division of client premiums among insurance companies allowing the sharing of the burden of a large risk.

Reinsurance

An insurance policy for insurers. In reinsurance, one insurer cedes a portion of its portfolio of policyholders to another insurer in exchange for paying a fee. There exists the possibility that too many policyholders will make a claim and a single insurer will be unable to pay the benefit without ruining itself. This is especially true for disaster insurance and other similar policies. Reinsurance reduces this risk. It is also called stop-loss insurance.

reinsurance

see INSURANCE COMPANY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obama administration officials started to make efforts to control stop-loss insurance to consolidate their grip on the health insurance market, Foxx said.
The opponents cite North Carolina as an example of a state that's tried to prevent what it sees as stop-loss abuse by regulating small stop-loss insurance plans as if they were ordinary health insurance plans.
Pulmonary collapse or respiratory failure was the ninth leading claim, resulting in $55 million in reimbursements from stop-loss insurance policies.
The issue right now is states that regulate insurance have seen these lower stop-loss insurance attachment points, and there has been a fair amount of legislative activity to increase at the state level what those attachment points can be.
The mother worked for a self-insured company, and the employer's specific stop-loss insurance had an $80,000 deductible.
But with the stop-loss insurance component, we can mitigate and address that risk for each company.
In addition to the attachment point restriction, the legislation contains language that erroneously refers to stop-loss insurance carriers providing “coverage” to individual employees and dependents.
of sales and marketing of stop-loss insurance for Elite Underwriters of Exton, Pennsylvania, believed to be one the nation's largest family-owned managing general underwriter.
SIIA lobbyists say the assessments unfairly shift the cost of paying for the uninsured onto the self-insured, and that stop-loss insurance earners bear an unfair funding burden.
A must for all self-insurers: a stop-loss insurance provider as umbrella coverage.
The law firm's health plan involved stop-loss insurance and required after-tax contributions by employees.
Medical groups may also decrease their risk by reducing their revenues, increasing the use of subcapitation agreements or purchasing of stop-loss insurance.