Stockout

(redirected from Stockouts)

Stockout

Running out of inventory.

Stockout

Informal; a situation in which a company sells its entire inventory. A stockout may occur, for example, when there is a delay in a scheduled delivery of new inventory, but the term usually refers to situations where demand exceeds supply, causing the company to run out of inventory earlier than expected.

stockout

see STOCK CONTROL.
References in periodicals archive ?
In collaboration with the government of Senegal and local partners, we piloted a new supply chain model in a few districts that virtually eliminated stockouts.
IPM has virtually eliminated inventory stockouts of contraceptives, thus ensuring that all women have access to a consistent, reliable supply of family planning products.
President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the Kenyan government supply chains to improve forecasting accuracy and avoid stockouts and rationing
Pastel Plus automatically identifies products that appear headed for stockouts or overstocks and simulates the volume of display merchandise and appropriate markdown prices for every store.
Laksham noted, “Within 60 days of deployment Ultriva, the Biotech/Pharmaceutical Company's manufacturing services team improved on-time delivery rates from 62% to 82%, while eliminating stockouts.
This concern is reflected in both component stockouts and lack of cash flow coming from high investments due to high inventory value.
This internal view of production scheduling had resulted in a high level of stockouts at the retail outlets.
In this issue of SAJHIVMED you will find an insert highlighting key points from a national survey conducted by the Stop Stock Outs Project assessing ARV and tuberculosis drug stockouts at the facility level.
Ironically, as in the recent Limpopo medicine stockouts debacle, it is the national minister who shoulders the blame--something that needs looking at,' said Lukhele.
The first approach emphasizes the desire to avoid any stockouts, so as to maximize the sales from the program; the second emphasizes the firm's goal of minimizing its costs by smoothing production and letting inventories serve as a buffer.
For example, a short-term delivery delay that results in stockouts and temporary loss of sales is arguably less severe than a long-term production shutdown that could occur from a natural disaster that destroys a production facility.