Stem the Tide


Also found in: Idioms.

Stem the Tide

Informal; to slow down a trend or change its direction. Stemming the tide especially applies to negative situations that are beginning to turn positive. For example, gradual and slow economic growth may be said to stem the tide of a recession. To stem the tide is also called to stop the bleeding.
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References in classic literature ?
But we must stem the tide of malice, and pour into the wounded bosoms of each other the balm of sisterly consolation.
As some wooded mountain-spur that stretches across a plain will turn water and check the flow even of a great river, nor is there any stream strong enough to break through it--even so did the two Ajaxes face the Trojans and stem the tide of their fighting though they kept pouring on towards them and foremost among them all was Aeneas son of Anchises with valiant Hector.
We believe that if we are to stem the tide of insecurity, provide employment at the grassroots level, allow participatory local governance at the grassroots level, develop the culture of political leadership, the emancipation of people from the shackles of poverty, local government system must be purely autonomous.
In order to stem growing trade malpractices at the Nigerian ports, which cause huge revenue losses, the Nigerian Shippers' Council (NSC) has reaffirmed that it will soon install advanced cargo information system, otherwise called Cargo Tracking Note (CTN) at the country's ports to stem the tide.
After letting the crisis on the border fester for over a month, Washington is still barely doing anything to stem the tide of migrant children entering our country, forcing Texas to act on its own, writes state Rep.
David Cameron is determined to stem the tide of House of Lords defeats.
The political parties entering the final few hours of canvassing are promising the sun, moon and stars to stem the tide of emigration.
Subbed at half time with the Clarets trailing 5-0, McDonald showered and went for a quiet pint as his teammates tried to stem the tide.
Even Stephen McPhail, playing his first game since returning from treatment for cancer, was unable to stem the tide as Cardiff wilted in the face of a storm and a delighted crowd of 44,028 saw substitute Lovenkrands claim a brace of his own.
But Keys were powerless to stem the tide and a Sneddon penalty hat-trick, to one by Paul Smithson put Wanderers 19-3 in command.
Even the introduction of the fresh legs of Luke Jackson and Donaldson failed to stem the tide as Cleveland finished strongly to score a further two late goals.
There were calls yesterday for a massive multi-billion pound boost in defence spending to reduce overstretch, stem the tide of resignations and prepare Britain's armed forces for possible future military threats from Iran and Russia.