Stem the Tide


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Stem the Tide

Informal; to slow down a trend or change its direction. Stemming the tide especially applies to negative situations that are beginning to turn positive. For example, gradual and slow economic growth may be said to stem the tide of a recession. To stem the tide is also called to stop the bleeding.
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Only an active, committed and stronger grassroots advocacy program can help stem the tide.
A one-month Europe-wide ban on live bird imports has been agreed to try to stem the tide of bird flu.
A one-month Europe-wide ban on live bird imports has been agreed in a bid to stem the tide of bird flu.
The report points out that government policy failed to stem the tide of rising inequality in both Canada and BC.
Many years ago, Pope John Paul II, the most respected man in the world, (and our Canadian bishops agreed) taught that "only a change of behaviour will stem the tide of AIDS.
By the novel's end, the family's dead-end stories have spiraled into the face of an evil so pure and horrific that we, the readers, must confront how to stem the tide of our children's societal neglect, poverty and racism.
What can you say when Ontario has to elect Liberals to stem the tide of an out of control deficit authored by right wing Tories.
We must stem the tide of this crisis by enacting meaningful reforms.
THE armed forces are being drafted in to stem the tide of illegal immigrants trying to sneak into Britain.
SIR - Alf Gooding concluded his very thoughtful article on the burgeoning manufacturing dominance of Third World countries, in particular China, by stating that, ``The time is right to consider the imposition of tariffs to stem the tide.
We believe that your principles as outlined are the fight approach to stem the tide of this devastating epidemic.
They hope greater financial transparency and improved board structures will be sufficient to stem the tide.