Statism

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Statism

1. In political science, the theory that the state exercises (or should exercise) control over a society and for that reason is a major engine of social change.

2. See: State capitalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet Hannan is troubled by the statist tendency he sees in Hungary's politics, something that cannot entirely be blamed on reaction to international pressure.
Throughout the book Levin discusses how limited government is jeopardized by the ambitions and overreach of modern utopianism, and how, with the best of intentions, "progressive" statists incrementally expand the powers and influence of government in a soft tyranny of welfare and administrative programs-the end being oppression and loss of liberty.
In fact, statists are looking for far more than a maternal embrace in the arms of big government.
It opens the door to a respectful consideration of every statist proposal, allowing an endless array of empirical support in its favor while declaring that we should never draw a firm conclusion.
In American literature in general, and in American poetry in particular, the best known and most admired figures have, on the whole, been collectivists and statists.
Would congressional statists be swayed by the political registration of commissioners?
The result is obvious to all but radical feminists and welfare statists.
If we who know the pitfalls of public control stay away from this most promising of transit alternatives, we will cede the ground to the statists who wish to use mass transit as a form of punishment for our environmental sins.
As Congressman Ron Paul (R-Texas) recalled not long ago, Greenspan used to decry how deficit spending and abandoning the gold standard in favor of flat currency had made it possible for "the welfare statists to use the banking system as a means to an unlimited expansion of credit.
So it looks to me as though we are headed for a triangular system in which libertarians and statists and terrorists interact with each other in a way that I'm afraid might turn out to be quite stable.
Many statists insist that the 9-11 atrocity illustrates that big government is a necessary defense against terrorists and similar predators.
Teddy might have been kicked out of Harvard for cheating, but that doesn't mean he hasn't learned how to milk the system for his fellow statists.