Sovereignty

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Related to State sovereignty: National sovereignty

Sovereignty

The legal right of a state to govern its own affairs in its own territory without outside interference. Sovereignty may reside with an individual (such as a monarch, sometimes known as a sovereign), a body (such as a parliament) or with the populace as a whole. The notion of sovereignty is less clear in federal governments like the U.S. and Canada, as sovereignty is split between the national government and the regional governments. This is a matter of considerable controversy in some countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any violation of her state sovereignty must be explained in clear terms by the violator.
Rather than rely on a juridical ideal in which sovereignty is usually understood as exclusive authority over territory (with the corollary being that said territory be coterminous with that authority), Saskia Sassen argues that "it is becoming evident that state sovereignty articulates both its own and external conditions and norms.
Nevertheless the sovereignty critique is distinct from that of cultural relativism, the principle of state sovereignty being as universal as the one of human rights: on the ground of its own sovereignty, whatever a state does in the field of human rights within its borders is its own business, and other states or international organizations cannot interfere.
This article is situated in the field of critical IR literature, which has in the past two decades attempted to apply Foucauldian methods in order to show how the lived reality of state sovereignty is created through minute practices of daily life.
In Moncrief's view, the growth of the state sovereignty movement over the past several years is attributable in large part to the Internet, which has facilitated efforts on the part of conservatives to force issues out of Washington and into states, where they might have a better chance of winning them.
cyberspace is immune from state sovereignty and the idea that cyberspace
The downside of the author's critique is that when analyzing European integration, he does so with the concept of integration as a whole and leaves a question open as to whether state sovereignty should be deployed in the rest of the European states as well, especially having in mind all the benefits that integration brought to the East-Central European states.
A Senate committee split on whether to advance the once-thought-dead ERA legislation, therefore killing it (for now), and a resolution asserting state sovereignty over the federal government lost a close vote in House State Agencies.
These conditions run counter to longstanding conventional wisdom surrounding norms of state sovereignty and the corollary principle of non-intervention, which have been the fundamental norms of international relations recognized in customary international law for centuries and reaffirmed in the UN Charter.
The possible confrontation of a super state and an international institution leads to the thorny problem and concept of state sovereignty.
Fukuyama proposes that the United States accept a paradoxical combination of aims: on the one hand, pragmatic realism, in which respecting state sovereignty retains a critical role in international relations; on the other, a greater readiness to bypass sovereignty in advancing democracy and human rights.
A spate of recent work urges the dismantling (O'Neill), 'vertical diffusion' (Pogge), or 'unbundling' (Elkins) of state sovereignty, blamed for an array of evils: aggressive nationalism, obstructing global cooperation on the environment and justice, and promoting war and human rights abuses.

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