Standard Industrial Classification Code


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Standard Industrial Classification Code

A four digit code used in business to classify the industry to which a company belongs. The SIC code was created by the U.S. government in 1937 to facilitate communication within and between businesses and industries. For the most part, the SIC was replaced by the six digit NAICS in 1997, but the SEC still uses the SIC. For example, an oil & gas exploration company might file with the SEC under the SIC code 1382.
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New features include: the ability to check data against telephone and fax preference service (TPS/FPS); lists to ensure that companies registered with the preference service are not targeted; access to named individuals at director level; and, in addition to searching via Thomson Directories' own database across 1,900 headings, users will be able to search across the extensive Standard Industrial Classification codes offering greater choice to search for the information needed.
This information is available on the county Web site for downloading into a prospect-management system and sorting by ZIP code or standard industrial classification codes for mailings or telemarketing.
Org Comprises World Wide Web's First Search Engine That Permits Retrieval Through Standard Industrial Classification Codes
The industry categories listed in this revenue procedure are derived from the Standard Industrial Classification codes (the "SIC" codes) set forth in the Office of Management and Budget Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1987).
The publisher points out that all company profiles contain critical sales, marketing and research data such as company name, telephone, FAX numbers, key executives by name and title, number of employees, sales volume, Standard Industrial Classification codes, plant square footage, and year established.
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