Split-Up

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Split-Up

An action in which a publicly-traded company splits into two different publicly-traded companies. Stock in the company is exchanged for stock in both of the new companies according to some predetermined formula. A split-up may happen at government instigation, for example, to end a monopoly. A company may also voluntarily split up if it believes it will improve profitability.
References in periodicals archive ?
The same may be true of split-ups in which the new company remains within the controlled group (e.
The Secretary shall prescribe such regulations as may be appropriate to carry out the purposes of this section, including regulations to prevent the avoidance of the purposes of this section through split-ups, shell corporations, partnerships, or otherwise.
We are maintaining our company's pattern of stock dividends and split-ups to share these successes with shareholders.
368(a)(1)(D) split-ups or split-offs (as opposed to spin-offs), it may be possible to step up the basis of a controlled corporation's assets with only one level of tax.
We are maintaining a pattern of stock dividends and split-ups in order to share United Security's successes with our shareholders," said Richard C.
The new ABAR credential means he's specially trained to evaluate valuation reports submitted in litigation, buy/sell agreement disputes, partner split-ups, mergers and acquisitions, gifting programs, divorces, and employee stock ownership plans (ESOPs).
Egos, infighting, intra- group intercourse and ye olde "it's me or the drugs" quandary await you in this thirty minute sad sojourn into split-ups.
United Security has established a pattern of stock dividends and split-ups in order to share the company's successes with our shareholders," said Richard C.
This plan is according to the mergers and split-ups law.
The Class C Warrants are protected from dilution upon the occurrence of certain events, including, without limitation, sales of Common Stock for less than fair market value, certain dividends, split-ups, reclassifications, mergers and asset sales.