Impairment

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Impairment

Reduction in the value of an asset because the asset no longer generates the benefits expected earlier as determined by the company through periodic assessments. This could happen because of changes in market value of the asset, business environment, government regulations, etc.

Impairment

A reduction in a company's working capital as a result of a loss on an investment or a distribution (such as a coupon or dividend) to investors.

impairment

Reduction in a firm's capital as a result of distributions or losses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diagnostic accuracy and test-retest reliability of nonword repetition and digit span tasks administered to preschool children with specific language impairment.
On the "specifics" of specific reading disability and specific language impairment.
The researchers have revealed that the gene found on Chromosome 6 was associated with variability in language abilities in a study of children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and their family members.
Language, social behavior, and the quality of friendships in adolescents with and without a history of specific language impairment.
Specific Language Impairment (SLI), for example, is evident fairly early in L1 development.
Phonological processing, language and literacy: A comparison of children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and those with specific language impairment.
The precise grammatical failures of children with this condition, known as specific language impairment (SLI), remain controversial.
Consequently, her book is not limited to the difficulties of particular subgroups of children, like those with specific language impairment, (2) but it includes all those phenomena which may possibly be explained in reference to a problem in the mapping of form and meaning.
Linguists from Germany, elsewhere in Europe, and the US discuss such topics as the development of conversational competence in children with specific language impairment, discourse under control in ambiguous sentences, numerals and scalar implicatures, meaning in the objects, blocking modal enrichment, and electrophysiological evidence for enriched composition.
This special issue of Linguistics is devoted to recent findings about children with specific language impairment (henceforth SLI) learning different first and second languages.

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