Soviet Ruble


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Soviet Ruble

The currency of the former Soviet Union. It was first issued in 1917 and underwent five redenominations over the course of its history. It was replaced by various currencies, starting in 1991 with the fall of the Soviet Union. See also: Russian ruble.
References in periodicals archive ?
9) The Soviet ruble was drained of economic value and permeated with social tensions.
He emphasized that Latvia could provide assistance in this regard, since the country has experience in transitioning from the Soviet ruble to the Latvian ruble to the lats.
The Soviet ruble was not the American dollar, whose symbol marked the bags held by the greedy bourgeois depicted in the caricatures published in Soviet newspapers and magazines.
I in fact made it a major concern to explore the problem posed by the divergences of Soviet ruble prices from 'scarcity values' and that because of such divergences I was led to reject the usual expedient in national income measurement, which is simply to value goods and services produced in terms of prices actually prevailing in the country in question.
Some Lithuanians worry that if they move toward an independent monetary policy too quickly, their savings deposits may disappear and the older Soviet ruble notes will suddenly become worthless.
After that, only war-torn Tajikistan continued to use the Soviet ruble.
The refusal of Ukraine to liberalize prices alongside Russia in January 1992, and the introduction of the Ukrainian coupon should have been enough to convince anyone, especially IMF experts in Washington, that the survival of the Soviet ruble was dangerous for Russia.
9 million Soviet rubles to North Korea, in 1950 these deliveries reached 869.
5 billion at the close of 2012, but more than $20 billion of the debt was in old transferable Soviet rubles, 90 percent of which Russia forgave in 2013.
5 billion at the close of 2010, but more than $20 billion of the debt was in old transferable Soviet rubles that Russia now claims but Cuba does not recognize.
Rubles, especially Soviet rubles, had no foreign exchange value in January 1920, for example, when according to the authors the ledger sheet shows that American journalist John Reed received 1,008,000 rubles in valuables.
However, as of April 1, 1989, questions of hiring and firing and forms and sizes of payment to employees as well as incentives in Soviet rubles, are decided by the JV's board.

Full browser ?