International Law

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International Law

The area of law dealing with relations between countries. International law consists of many aspects, both written and unwritten, but often refers to matters of war and peace, respect for human rights, international trade and commerce, and similar things. Institutions like the United Nations and the International Criminal Court purport to enforce international law, though their effectiveness is limited by the cooperation given by member states. In general, international law is governed by treaties between sovereign states.
References in periodicals archive ?
Admittedly, there are some sources of international law that do not resemble domestic sources of law at first glance.
After all, the many sources of international law allow for different laws covering the same issues.
Chapters specifically address sources of international law, the law of treaties, the legal status of actors in the international arena, international dispute settlement including international civil courts and civil tribunals, jurisdiction, title to territory, international human rights, the use of force including war, international criminal law, the law of the sea, and international environmental law.
Thus these sources of international law are clearly capable of limiting
Chapters discuss the sources of international law, the history of international law, states and territories, the rights and responsibilities of states, the global commons, international organizations, the individual, diplomatic and consular law, the law of treaties, and the laws regarding armed activities.
In terms of international law as an operating system, chapters address sources of international law, participants in the international legal process, implementation and compliance with international law, and international legal structures, while in terms of international law as a normative system, they explore regulation of the use of force, protection of individual rights, protection of the environment, and management of the commons.
It offers chapters on the development of multilateral law-making, the multilateral treaty (the charter of the United Nations specifically) as constitution, the sources of international law as sources of multilateral rights and obligations, standing to claim for breaches of multilateral obligations, and the evolution of peremptory norms and international crimes of state.