Ser

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Ser

An obsolete Indian unit of dry volume equivalent to one liter.
References in classic literature ?
That I will do," she replied; "I will treat her as she treated your son.
My son, my dear son," I exclaimed, kissing him in a transport of joy.
Helen wept, Telemachus wept, and so did Menelaus, nor could Pisistratus keep his eyes from filling, when he remembered his dear brother Antilochus whom the son of bright Dawn had killed.
One can soon see when a man is son to one whom heaven has blessed both as regards wife and offspring--and it has blessed Nestor from first to last all his days, giving him a green old age in his own house, with sons about him who are both well disposed and valiant.
The son of Peleus was furious, and his heart within his shaggy breast was divided whether to draw his sword, push the others aside, and kill the son of Atreus, or to restrain himself and check his anger.
for Juno had sent her in the love she bore to them both), and seized the son of Peleus by his yellow hair, visible to him alone, for of the others no man could see her.
Boris," she said to her son with a smile, "I shall go in to see the count, my uncle; but you, my dear, had better go to Pierre meanwhile and don't forget to give him the Rostovs' invitation.
So well-girded Polycaste, the youngest daughter of Nestor, Neleus' son, was joined in love with Telemachus through golden Aphrodite and bare Persepolis.
And of Aeson and Polymede, according to Hesiod, Iason was born: `Aeson, who begot a son Iason, shepherd of the people, whom Chiron brought up in woody Pelion.
While the lawyer was on his way to Fulham, Lord Holchester's son was on his way to Portland Place.
Suppose I informed him--as I inform you in confidence--that his son
The young lady whom Mr Nightingale had intended for his son was a near neighbour of his brother, and an acquaintance of his niece; and in reality it was upon the account of his projected match that he was now come to town; not, indeed, to forward, but to dissuade his brother from a purpose which he conceived would inevitably ruin his nephew; for he foresaw no other event from a union with Miss Harris, notwithstanding the largeness of her fortune, as neither her person nor mind seemed to him to promise any kind of matrimonial felicity: for she was very tall, very thin, very ugly, very affected, very silly, and very ill-natured.