buyer's market

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Buyer's market

Market in which the supply exceeds the demand, creating lower prices. Antithesis of seller's market.

Buyer's Market

A market situation in which lower prices prevail due to excess supply and a shortage of demand. A buyer's market may occur in one particular sector or across the wider economy. For example, if there are 10 houses in a neighborhood and eight of them are up for sale, it is likely that their prices will race toward the bottom. This means that a prospective homebuyer looking in that area will almost certainly find a good deal on a house. See also: Seller's market.

buyer's market

a MARKET situation characterized by the temporary excess supply of a GOOD or SERVICE often leading to cutthroat price competition. In such markets BUYERS are advantageously placed to obtain price concessions. Compare SELLER'S MARKET.

buyer's market

a SHORT-RUN market situation in which there is EXCESS SUPPLY of goods or services at current prices, which forces prices down to the advantage of the buyer. Compare SELLER'S MARKET.

buyer's market

A market with more properties for sale than can reasonably be expected to be purchased by the available demand. As a result, sellers will have to compete against each other to attract buyers and will usually do so by lowering prices.

References in periodicals archive ?
Soft markets force the industry's more reputable institutions to pay more attention to customer service, and to revamp billing systems, a critical customer touch point all too often ignored by the industry.
Some analysts, who view the current soft market as a return to normalcy in light of the skyrocketing premiums following September 11 and the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons, predict that these policyholder-friendly conditions will continue for another 15 years.
Buyers, too, tend to focus too much on price during soft markets instead of on service and on long-term relationships.
The Solution: Experienced MGAs weather soft markets by creating new products, cross-selling to brokers and maintaining good client relationships.
During hard markets, alternative facilities are more attractive, and during soft markets, their relative economic attractiveness is less.