Society


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Society

A group of persons who, by accident or design, are related to each other in some way and therefore have to deal with each other. Examples of societies include everyone who attends the same church, lives in the same country, or belongs to the same club. According to most political and economic theories, persons in a society have the responsibility to care for other members of that society, though exactly how to do so remains a matter of contention. While some theories emphasize the role of society, more individualistic theories tend to minimize its role.
References in classic literature ?
It is remarkable that persons who speculate the most boldly often conform with the most perfect quietude to the external regulations of society.
The bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionising the instruments of production, and thereby the relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society.
A man should not go where he cannot carry his whole sphere or society with him,--not bodily, the whole circle of his friends, but atmospherically.
The reader will not be surprised, then, at the calmness with which the doctor received the applause that welcomed him in the Royal Society.
And as for appearance, he was the most distinguished-looking man in our society.
Among other good principles upon which this society was founded, there was one very remarkable; for, as it was a rule of an honourable club of heroes, who assembled at the close of the late war, that all the members should every day fight once at least; so 'twas in this, that every member should, within the twenty-four hours, tell at least one merry fib, which was to be propagated by all the brethren and sisterhood.
Those who are sufficiently interested to desire to read his own detailed account of the society he would fain establish, will find an excellent passage in Aphorism 57 of "The Antichrist".
She disliked in Levin his strange and uncompromising opinions and his shyness in society, founded, as she supposed, on his pride and his queer sort of life, as she considered it, absorbed in cattle and peasants.
But this is not, or never was, a vindictive Society.
I wish Society was not so arbitrary, I wish it was not so exacting -- Bird, be quiet
It shall likewise come to pass, at as nearly as possible the same period, that Society will discover that it always did despise Veneering, and distrust Veneering, and that when it went to Veneering's to dinner it always had misgivings--though very secretly at the time, it would seem, and in a perfectly private and confidential manner.
and three other Pickwickians hereinafter named, for forming a new branch of United Pickwickians, under the title of The Corresponding Society of the Pickwick Club.

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