superstructure

(redirected from Social infrastructure)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

superstructure

That portion of a building or other structure that is aboveground.

References in periodicals archive ?
Fujitsu Mission Critical Systems' strength lies in building platforms for mission critical social infrastructure systems.
The Government of South Africa needs to actively seek and promote the creation of long-lasting partnerships with private sector entities that will lead to the continuous improvement of social infrastructure in the country," explains Milne.
The Jeddah summit will provide organizations in civil engineering, primary construction, secondary finishing and related sectors with new insight into design, construction and business model considerations to develop a cohesive and efficient social infrastructure.
He emphasized that budget allocations would be made to tackle shortages in economic and social infrastructure facilities.
The social infrastructure division's sales rose 31 percent to 1.
The proposed social infrastructure projects include the development of a ''superhighway'' that runs through the African continent and of ports, airports and power generation.
The fund is designed to build and own the social infrastructure in lieu of budget deficit-ridden national and local governments and then to capitalize on revenues from utility fees paid by users of the facilities.
for Improvement of Social Infrastructure, partner: CHF--Canadian Society for International Health (Ottawa), for the "Public Health Strengthening in Guyana" Project;
Highlighting the need for social infrastructure and welfare in communities in Jordan, Her Majesty Queen Rania Al-Abdullah visited Bweidah, a village in the north of Jordan, on Monday, to offer assistance and ensure that proper facilities are installed in the area.
The country also has easy access from major financial centres, excellent communications as well as world-class physical and social infrastructure.
Although they lived with the same environmental contaminants, white residents believed that the oil economy strengthened their economic, educational, and social infrastructure.
ONE WAY TO RESPOND TO CONSISTENT INCOME DISPARITIES is to build a domestic social infrastructure that mitigates some of the worst effects of inequity and poverty, for example, the cradle-to-grave social welfarism that Northern European societies developed during their growth-spurt years after WWII.
Full browser ?