Snake

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Snake

Arrangement established in 1972, that ties European currencies to each other within specified limits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most often, snake bites mostly occur in evenings and at night when they are accidentally stepped on as they move through leaf litters and scrap materials in the environment.
Subsequently, the self-styled healer performed some rituals for the next 48 hours, while claiming to be curing the youth of the snake bite, but his condition deteriorated further.
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most significant complications developing due to snake bite.
The whole family was left devastated by the sudden turn of events but now wants to warn others about the dangers of snake bites.
Incidence of snakebite was mainly reported during the monsoon with maximum incidence of snake bite, 172 (22.
For many rural and agricultural communities around the world - particularly in India and sub-Saharan Africa - there are few more immediate daily threats than that of venomous snake bites.
The post Man in ICU Paphos after snake bite appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Snake bites tend to occur in the late afternoon or early evening, however, when on the alert for snakes its important for people to remain vigilant throughout the day.
NORTH Wales could see a surge in the number of venomous snake bites because of the current warm weather spell.
He made significant contributions to the scientific programme and two of his important presentations which were much more relevant to the situation in Asia were on Rabies and Snake Bite in South Asia.
The World Health Organization estimates place the number of snake bites to be 421,000 envenoming and 20,000 deaths occur worldwide from snake bite each year, but warn that these figures may be as high as 1,841,000 envenoming and 94,000 deaths per annum.
In Australia each year there are approximately 3000 incidents of snake bite, resulting in 1-4 deaths despite the wide availability of first aid, intensive care and antivenom (Isbister et al.