Word

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Word

Informal; an advertisement or a set of advertisements in succession. The term is most common in broadcasting. For example, a radio announcer may say, "And now a word from our sponsors."
References in periodicals archive ?
I don't think anybody of our generation could not have been engaged by what was happening in America,'' Slovo said.
Brittain, Victoria and Gillian Slovo (taken from spoken evidence).
15) Fedor Osipovich Bulgakov, "Sionskaia knizhka bogodukhnovennykh izrechenii Davyda Essevicha, on zhe Fedor Osipovich Bulgakov," in Bozhestvennyia izrecheniia nastavnikov i stradal'tsev za slovo bozhie, veru Iisusa i dukh sviatoi religii dukhovnykh khristian molokanprygunov, ed.
Reread, if you can, the great speeches from the likes of Kwame Nkrumah, Jomo Kenyatta, Mwalimu Nyerere, Robert Mugabe (in his first manifestation), Amilcar Cabral, Leopold Senghor, Salim Ahmed Salim, Ali Mazrui, Chief Obafemi Awolwo and in more recent times, Archbishop Tutu, Nelson Mandela, Thabo Mbeki, Joe Slovo, Walter Sisulu and a host of others.
Matulichenko [Zuzenko], 'Kak ia, anarkhist, stal lenintsem', Novoe russkoe slovo, 16 February 1921, p.
Joe Slovo indicates that there was a sufficient amount of engagements
Raquel Rolnik highlighted the removal of 20,000 people from the Joe Slovo settlement in Johannesburg to make way for rental housing for this year's World Cup in South Africa, saying they were moved to "impoverished areas".
He had made lasting friendships at the university with Joe Slovo, Harry Schwarz and Ruth First, who were later to join him in his struggle against Apartheid, but he failed every subject.
Slovo spisovateli k III: sjezdu nasich druzstevniku.
When Miliband made his remarks, he was defending the actions of Joe Slovo, a white Marxist who was one of the leaders of Umkhonto we Sizwe (Spear of the Nation), the military wing of the African National Congress, during the struggle against apartheid in South Africa.
Those were not the words of Nelson Mandela, Archbishop Tutu or Joe Slovo, but were uttered by none other than the architect of apartheid itself, racist Prime Minister, Dr.
Among the leading lights of the struggle were Helen Suzman, whom Leon replaced in Parliament in 1989, and Joe Slovo, the former head of the South African Communist Party (SACP).