Slavery

(redirected from Slaveowner)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
References in periodicals archive ?
69) The bishops could, and did, continue to advise the conduct of individual slaveowners.
Nelson essentially abandons his son to remain with the Young Massa, and suggests that his choice reflects loyalty not to the slaveowner, but to his unacknowledged half-brother as family:
Is it true that the American Founding was corrupted by a base and unwarranted compromise with slavery, and that the Framers of the Constitution, many of whom were slaveowners, revealed themselves as racist hypocrites?
The South's antebellum slaveowners declared (i) that their slaves had no claims other than those given by their owners, and yet (ii) that their slaves were subject to moral law, and not only subject to moral law but subject to a moral law under which their owners have claims against them, and they therefore have duties towards their owners.
Dana's personal rise and fall (or more literally, her fall and rise) operates in tandem with the exploitative values of a patriarchal speculative economy, granting Rufus Weylin, a white slaveowner, the unchallenged role of bearing history and lineage to the detriment of the victims living and passed--of the triangular trade and of male sexist prerogative.
Malchow's Gothic Images of Race in Nineteenth-Century Britain (148-65) for versions of this argument and Leonard Cassuto's The Inhuman Race for the link between monsters and representations of the African American slave and slaveowner.
But the reform movements that thrived in the resulting language of egalitarianism--movements for the abolition of slavery and the rights of women, for example--had little to do with the real Andrew Jackson, who was both an unrepentant slaveowner and a devotee of an already antiquated cult of masculinity.
As the text makes clear, while the Clause gave a slaveowner the right to have his property "delivered up," the law was not self-executing.
As they note, Jefferson, despite his brave words about equality and the abomination of slavery in the southern states, was himself a slaveowner and refused to free his own slaves, most of whom he inherited, along with a large estate, from his father-in-law.
The lone dissenter was a former slaveowner from Kentucky named John Marshall Harlan.
Andrew for being married to a slaveowner, many believed that separation was in the nation's best interests.
Some fifty pages later, the reader suddenly learns that the slave accepts the latter name when the slaveowner threatens to have his pregnant wife whipped.