Slavery

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Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The religion of the slavemaster sounds hauntingly similar to what sometimes parades around today as "Evangelical" Christianity, which I believe may be at the core of the tensions we face.
That's how the old slavemaster ruled the first black people.
The system is designed to provide rapid cargo movement and to maximise cost effectiveness; flexibility is a key issue in a modern cargo operation and SLAVEMASTER System will maximise this whilst providing efficient floor space availability.
With the screen name Slavemaster, John Robinson arranged to meet women for sado-masochistic sex through internet chat rooms.
It's impossible to withhold assent from Turner's critique, and tempting to add that the inclusion of Providence sneaks in the appalling idea that the human institution of slavery enjoyed divine support, that apprenticeship is by definition a temporally limited contract, and that the savage in any slavemaster relationship is surely the master.
Of that bust-up with Kanhai, Clarke stormed: "He was a slavemaster.
The chores done, the slave is freed but tricked into choosing rocky hilltop instead of rich valley property because the hill land is named by the slavemaster as the "bottom of heaven--best land there is" (4-5).
Imitating the canting voice of a hypocritical preacher, Douglass then gave a several-paragraph sermon based on the principle that obedience to the slavemaster is obedience to God.
Beloved's heroine Sethe has had a tree of flesh on her back ever since she was whipped by the slavemaster.
Indeed, as she herself explains in Mules and Men, within the African American folk tradition, the character of God is often identified with the slavemaster, just as the devil is often a clever trickster who triumphs over God's superior power through wit and resourcefulness.
Great Gram Corregidora charges her family to "bear witness," to have children who must memorize her old slavemaster Corregidora's atrocities and recite them at Armageddon, "when the ground and the sky open up to ask them that question that's going to be ask" (41).
As a portrayal of a sexual relationship between dominant Tlic and disempowered human, the scene encourages a reading through the metaphor of white male slavemaster and enslaved female.