Skilled Labor

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Skilled Labor

The ability to perform a specific task or occupation. For example, a locksmith has the skill to make new keys for customers' homes and cars. Other examples of skilled laborers include carpenters, mechanics, graphic designers, and so forth. Skilled workers are often more highly paid than unskilled workers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The founder Donna Livingston is also an award winning designer and has been appreciated by many leading personnel for her innovative presentation and skilled works.
He says Maine's skilled work force and investments in composites research combined to help bring the company to Maine to make a composite passenger aircraft.
It added the nature of the rural economy, which it said traditionally involved people who were low-paid, or in seasonal jobs or less skilled work, meant there were disproportionately more people liv-v ing in poverty or who were unemployed in these areas.
Murphy said: "UK defence contracts provide vital skilled work and have generated a welcome resurgence in our Scottish shipbuilding industry.
And when you consider Michigan's skilled work force with the euro-dollar relationship, you can see that Heller gains a big cost advantage over its competitors.
We are making a commitment to be rural Maine's partner in building an educated and skilled work force.
Good meals were provided as a result of energetic and skilled work in the kitchens and evening entertainments were arranged.
The average homeowner does not consider a gardening service highly skilled work and does not want to pay a lot more money for it.
While each county sports an aggressive economic development agency, offers a skilled work force and an infrastructure of schools, hospitals and highways, jobs continue to drain out of New York State's heartland despite a scattering of high-profile transactions.
In addition, whatever work is sent offshore, higher skilled work will remain stateside, thereby ramping up U.
In addition, Panama has a highly skilled work force that can contribute to the success of any company.
The inevitability of the scheme's outcome doesn't diminish from Zuckoff's book, which is paced more like a detective novel than a skilled work of financial journalism.