Skilled Labor


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Skilled Labor

The ability to perform a specific task or occupation. For example, a locksmith has the skill to make new keys for customers' homes and cars. Other examples of skilled laborers include carpenters, mechanics, graphic designers, and so forth. Skilled workers are often more highly paid than unskilled workers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tradesmen International has been providing contingent skilled labor to construction and industrial partners for twenty-two years.
First, migration of skilled labor may induce cross-country migration of unskilled labor or, more importantly, capital.
President ICCI highlighted the dire need of producing skilled human resource as per requirements of industries and expressed concern that there is no unique portal that has data of skilled labor force in the country.
Furthermore, our results indicate that the productive contribution of skilled labor is significantly higher in firms that import foreign capital.
The lack of skilled labor would only make the matter even worse, stated the
Also impacting this industry is a decrease in qualified skilled labor which is putting the squeeze on smaller regional companies who may have a harder time recruiting and training workers.
We think of the IT revolution as having been initiated in the mid-1970s; the defining event was that the relative price of new capital, which is complementary to skilled labor, fell significantly.
This installation typically requires only a few hours to complete, uses lower skilled labor, and saves valuable construction time during plant upgrades.
This threatens to shrink the supply of highly skilled labor in the U.
While she rejects the argument that industrialization caused such behavior - the family had always been a site of male violence and sexual conflict - she acknowledges that given the centrality of skilled labor to ideas of masculinity the increased use of cheap female and child labor in workshops and factories greatly exacerbated it.
Addressing skilled labor needs and technological advancements are not new concerns, but they continue as top-of-mind issues among firms serious about their competitiveness and future viability.
Reich's most compelling (and frequently repeated) theme stresses skilled labor as our only likely source of sustainable advantage in a global low-wage marketplace.